Hillary R. BognEr, MD, MSCE

Hillary R. Bogner MD MSCE is an Associate Professor in Family Medicine and a Senior Scholar in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Dr. Bogner earned her Bachelor of Arts degree majoring in Psychology with honors from the University of Chicago and received her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She completed a residency in Family Medicine at the Thomas Jefferson University where she was Chief Resident in her third year. In 2001, she earned the Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Bogner investigates the integration of care for depression and medical co-morbidity in primary health care settings – a problem with high public health significance. She has chosen to focus on cardiovascular disease as a model for integration of care with depression. Her work in depression and CVD has focused on adherence to depression treatment as a serious problem limiting the public health impact of available effective treatment. In addition, she has contributed to materials directed at practicing physicians. Her work shows that early patterns of non-adherence to depression medication may be related to patient-level factors, setting the stage for targeted interventions. She has examined the role of medical co-morbidity in the recognition and treatment of depression among older adults, finding that depression is a significant contributor to mortality among persons with medical co-morbidity such as diabetes that can be mitigated with practice-based interventions. In other work, she studied how medical co-morbidity -- such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other chronic medical conditions -- modifies response to depression treatment. Based on findings from patient interviews, Dr. Bogner developed an intervention integrating depression treatment with medical treatment for cardiovascular disease and has published the results of pilot studies testing its effectiveness. The intervention was informed by the findings of the K23 Award and the RWJF Generalist Physician Faculty Scholars Award. To further examine the effectiveness of integrated interventions for depression and cardiovascular disease she was awarded a Grant-in-Aid Award from the American Heart Association and a Clinical Research Award from the American Diabetes Association. She has a funded K18 (AHRQ) which is utilizing a participatory approach to inspire a new services delivery model for diabetes care. The basis of this model is to include patient’s nonbiomedical needs (financial, social, and emotional) as part of primary care treatment discussions and decisions. She is the Principal Investigator on a funded Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) project to fill gaps in the understanding of health care disparities as experienced by adults with disabilities and how differences in the quality of care received might be impacting their wellbeing. She recently completed an R21 (NIMH) to assess how different primary care practices approach implementation of the chronic care model for depression and diabetes and developed a tool kit to facilitate implementation.  She completed an R01 (NIMH) study to examine the course of depressive symptoms and medical comorbidity, studying the risk factors for the onset of major depression and suicidal ideation and an R34 (NIMH) to assess the feasibility of an intervention trial to improve adherence to depression and hypertension treatment. Her work has been recognized by the American Geriatrics Society, the American Public Health Association, and awards committees at the University of Pennsylvania.